FAQ

What is an Audiometer?

An audiometer is used for evaluating hearing acuity. It usually consist of an embedded hardware unit connected to a pair of headphones and a test subject feedback button, sometimes controlled by a standard PC. Such systems can also be used with bone vibrators, to test conductive hearing mechanisms

Audiometers are standard equipment at ENT (ear, nose, throat) clinics and in audiology centers. An alternative to hardware audiometers are software audiometers, which are available in many different configurations. Screening PC-based audiometers use a standard computer. Clinical PC-based audiometers are generally more expensive than software audiometers, but are much more accurate and efficient. They are most commonly used in hospitals, audiology centers and research communities. These audiometers are also used to conduct industrial audiometric testing. Some audiometers even provide a software developer's kit that provides researchers with the capability to create their own diagnostic tests.

For more visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audiometer

What is a Tympanometer?

Tympanometer is used to mesure the condition of the middle ear[1] and mobility of the eardrum (tympanic membrane) and the conduction bones by creating variations of air pressure in the ear canal. This test is known as Tympanometry Test.

Tympanometry is an objective test of middle-ear function. It is not a hearing test, but rather a measure of energy transmission through the middle ear. The test should not be used to assess the sensitivity of hearing and the results of this test should always be viewed in conjunction with pure tone audiometry.

Tympanometry is a valuable component of the audiometric evaluation. In evaluating hearing loss, tympanometry permits a distinction between sensorineural and conductive hearing loss, when evaluation is not apparent via Weber and Rinne testing. Furthermore, in a primary care setting, tympanometry can be helpful in making the diagnosis of otitis media by demonstrating the presence of a middle ear effusion.

For more visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tympanometry